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"It's only my first time" vs "Only it's my first time"?



 
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"It's only my first time" vs "Only it's my first time"? #1 (permalink) Thu Dec 22, 2005 23:27 pm   "It's only my first time" vs "Only it's my first time"?
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #56 "Chit Chat: In the Aeroplane", question 1

Linda: Have you ever ......... before? Only it's my first time in a plane and I'm a little nervous.

(a) fled
(b) flown
(c) flowed
(d) flying

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #56 "Chit Chat: In the Aeroplane", answer 1

Linda: Have you ever flown before? Only it's my first time in a plane and I'm a little nervous.

Correct answer: (b) flown
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Doesn't "It's only my first time" sounds better than "Only it's my first time" ? Is there a specific difference between these two sentences?
Thank you
Anatol
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Only #2 (permalink) Thu Dec 22, 2005 23:34 pm   Only
 

Hi,

The difference is just a difference in emphasis. Both are fine.

Alan
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Only #3 (permalink) Fri Dec 30, 2005 11:53 am   Only
 

Could 'only' here mean 'you see'?

Thank you.
Conchita
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Joined: 26 Dec 2005
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Location: Madrid, Spain

Only #4 (permalink) Fri Dec 30, 2005 13:26 pm   Only
 

Hi Conchita,

An interesting point and perhaps I should have given our friend Anatol a more detailed answer. Only, as you know usually qualifies something like a noun or verb and in this way points the way to making that something exclusive but in the conversation (Chit Chat) I've used the word as a sort of conjunction and it has the meaning of but contrasting the fact that other people have flown but she hasn't. It is used a lot in conversation and often suggests that the speaker is apologising. You could for example be standing outside a shop waiting for it to open and it hasn't, although it's after say 9.30. You ask someone for information: Excuse me do you know if this shop is opening today only the door is still shut?

Just some thoughts.

Alan
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Only #5 (permalink) Fri Dec 30, 2005 13:38 pm   Only
 

Many thanks for your explanations, Alan.
Conchita
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Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

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