Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
beginning; introductory
sporadic
initiative
thorough
infant
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Idiom: an axe to grind



 
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Regular verb dismay | Idiom: two ships that pass in the night
listening exercises
Message
Author
Idiom: an axe to grind #1 (permalink) Sun Jan 08, 2006 11:18 am   Idiom: an axe to grind
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #14 "British Idioms", question 5

Well I didn't have an axe to grind as far as she's concerned.

(a) a straight reason for getting involved
(b) a clever reason for getting involved
(c) a personal reason for getting involved
(d) a simple reason for getting involved

English Idioms and Expressions, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #14 "British Idioms", answer 5

Well I didn't have a personal reason for getting involved as far as she's concerned.

Correct answer: (c) a personal reason for getting involved
_________________________

what is means
maximV
Guest





Idiom: an axe to grind #2 (permalink) Sun Jan 08, 2006 11:24 am   Idiom: an axe to grind
 

Hi,

This expression means you keep talking about or are supporting something which is of great interest to you personally.

You could for example become a member of an organisation or political party that says exactly what you believe in and in that way you join because you have an axe to grind.

Just some thoughts

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

Can you find all the prepositions in this story?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Start exploring the English language today! Subscribe to free email English course
Display posts from previous:   
Regular verb dismay | Idiom: two ships that pass in the night
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
What is the difference between vow and promise?What is the country of origin?Felt is the past tense of feelChange vs. adpatDifference between doubt and concernIdiom: keep mumWhy bandits is apt for this sentence?Range vs. stroll?Meaning of knee upSynonyms for danger: risk vs. hazardIdiom: to clear the bankWhat makes - third person singularDifference between adapt and adjust

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail