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Responsibility vs. concern



 
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Responsibility vs. concern #1 (permalink) Sun Jan 15, 2006 17:56 pm   Responsibility vs. concern
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #17 "Down to Earth", question 9

Let's put it like this you made the decision and so it's down to you as to what happens next.

(a) your responsibility
(b) your concern
(c) your turn
(d) your thought

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #17 "Down to Earth", answer 9

Let's put it like this you made the decision and so it's your responsibility as to what happens next.

Correct answer: (a) your responsibility

Your answer was: incorrect
Let's put it like this you made the decision and so it's your concern as to what happens next.
_________________________

I don't quite see why I should be responsible for what happens after I've made a decision, unless I have some kind of telekinetic powers. A decision is something abstract and isn't necessarily followed by an action. On the other hand I can be concerned or worried as to how what I've decided to do will affect my life or other people's IF and WHEN I do it. At least thats how I see it. Id appreciate your explaining why you chose the first option here.
Conchita
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Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Responsibility #2 (permalink) Sun Jan 15, 2006 18:40 pm   Responsibility
 

Hi Conchita,

I accept your logical comments but really this is a language thing. Concern is usually used in a negative way as in:
It's not my concern/no concern of mine what happens.

Again in both negative and positive statements using the same basic form:

I'm not concerned about/I am concerned about what happens.

The most appropriate word here is responsibility however unfair and unjust you may think the comment by the speaker may be in making the other person responsible for what happens.
That's why I chose that word.

Alan
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Responsibility #3 (permalink) Sun Jan 15, 2006 19:13 pm   Responsibility
 

Hello Alan,

Thank you for trying to enlighten me, which you are usually very good at. From now on, I'll think twice before airily saying that English is not that complicated.
Conchita
Language Coach


Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Responsibility vs. concern #4 (permalink) Tue Nov 28, 2006 6:56 am   Responsibility vs. concern
 

Hi,

I was really being carried away by your conversations here and almost forgot my question....

So, be down to you = be up to you = be your responsibility. To me, this is another example for the 'up = down' :o phenomenon as we have in: fill out = fill in (out = in :o ), live off = live on (off = on :o ), etc. Oh, sorry for my rubbish but I just wondered if there had been something behind the scenes to actuate these phrases to be equal or close in meanings but with opposite 'parts'.

haihao
Haihao
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Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

Responsibility vs. concern #5 (permalink) Thu Oct 27, 2011 18:10 pm   Responsibility vs. concern
 

Could I also say "it's up to you as to what happens next"?
Licinio
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Joined: 23 Apr 2011
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Location: Bergamo, Italy

Responsibility vs. concern #6 (permalink) Thu Oct 27, 2011 18:27 pm   Responsibility vs. concern
 

Hi Licinio,

Yes, that's fine.

Alan
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