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Robber, thief and bandit?



 
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Robber, thief and bandit? #1 (permalink) Tue Jan 17, 2006 4:53 am   Robber, thief and bandit?
 

English Synonym, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #73 "Synonyms for robber and thief", question 1

The ......... attacked the owner of the house and disappeared with the expensive painting.

(a) robbers
(b) thieves
(c) stealers
(d) criminals

English Synonym, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #73 "Synonyms for robber and thief", answer 1

The robbers attacked the owner of the house and disappeared with the expensive painting.

Correct answer: (a) robbers
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what is the difference between these synonyms?
Emma Closer
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Robber, thief, stealer, criminal #2 (permalink) Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:24 am   Robber, thief, stealer, criminal
 

Hi,
Robber is a person who steals; anyone who unlawfully takes somebody else’s property in his presence, usually by using force.
Thief is a person who takes property belonging to someone else, without the knowledge of the owner, with the intention of keeping it or selling it; usually without violence.
Stealer is the same as thief.
Criminal is the general word for a person who breaks the law and commits any crime – stealing, killing, etc.
Daniela
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Robber, thief, stealer, criminal #3 (permalink) Wed Feb 01, 2006 1:10 am   Robber, thief, stealer, criminal
 

Daniela wrote:
Hi,
Robber is a person who steals; anyone who unlawfully takes somebody else’s property in his presence, usually by using force.
Thief is a person who takes property belonging to someone else, without the knowledge of the owner, with the intention of keeping it or selling it; usually without violence.
Stealer is the same as thief.
Criminal is the general word for a person who breaks the law and commits any crime – stealing, killing, etc.
Daniela

what about burglar and bandit?
Guest






Burglar vs. bandit #4 (permalink) Wed Feb 01, 2006 8:20 am   Burglar vs. bandit
 

Dear Emma Closer,
A bandit is usually a member of a gang who robs by violence; an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band.
A burglar is a person who breaks into a house (breaks a door or a window in order to enter), or shop, or other building, with the aim of stealing something.
Daniela
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Robber, thief and bandit? #5 (permalink) Sat Jul 31, 2010 7:32 am   Robber, thief and bandit?
 

Hello Teachers,

who is a snatcher?

Thanks a lot!
Sonia*
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 19 Aug 2009
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Robber, thief and bandit? #6 (permalink) Sat Jul 31, 2010 8:59 am   Robber, thief and bandit?
 

A thief who grabs a bag/purse and runs is "a purse snatcher".
The term 'snatcher' is also applied to a kidnapper: someone who unlawfully seizes and detains a victim (usually for ransom).
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Robber, thief and bandit? #7 (permalink) Sat Jul 31, 2010 11:56 am   Robber, thief and bandit?
 

Beeesneees wrote:
A thief who grabs a bag/purse and runs is "a purse snatcher".
The term 'snatcher' is also applied to a kidnapper: someone who unlawfully seizes and detains a victim (usually for ransom).

Thanks for the explanation.

Sonia*
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Robber, thief and bandit? #8 (permalink) Wed May 30, 2012 10:22 am   Robber, thief and bandit?
 

At the end of the day this question may be answered with any one of the given choices. A thief will still kill and assault, and no one really uses 'robbers' anymore. What is left is that it is generally only used as a verb, such as: to rob a bank. Thieves may rob a bank. As may bandits or bad guys.

have fun!
Leksicon
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Joined: 30 May 2012
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Robber, thief and bandit? #9 (permalink) Wed May 30, 2012 11:12 am   Robber, thief and bandit?
 

Leksicon wrote:
At the end of the day this question may be answered with any one of the given choices. A thief will still kill and assault, and no one really uses 'robbers' anymore. What is left is that it is generally only used as a verb, such as: to rob a bank. Thieves may rob a bank. As may bandits or bad guys.

have fun!

I think that thieves always steal on the sly.
And robbers are a more violent lot - I wouldn't put it past them to commit battery.
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