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until he had seen vs. until he saw



 
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I honestly couldn't follow a word you were saying | What does this phrase mean: "even steven"?
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until he had seen vs. until he saw #1 (permalink) Thu Feb 02, 2006 16:27 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #92 "Tenses (3)", question 5

He refused to go until he ......... seen all the paintings.

(a) had
(b) was
(c) is
(d) has

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #92 "Tenses (3)", answer 5

He refused to go until he had seen all the paintings.

Correct answer: (a) had
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why had seen?

Gella
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Had seen #2 (permalink) Thu Feb 02, 2006 18:31 pm   Had seen
 

Hi Gella,

The best way I can explain this is by saying that the refusing to go (the non going if you like) was after the seeing. His actual words were: I refuse to go until I have seen and this converts in reported speech as: He refused to go until he had seen. Another way is to say: He didn't go until he had seen ..

Alan
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until he had seen vs. until he saw #3 (permalink) Tue Aug 10, 2010 16:01 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

Dear teachers,

Can I say "He refused to go until he saw all the paintings."
Thanks in advance.

Aiken
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Aiken
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until he had seen vs. until he saw #4 (permalink) Tue Aug 10, 2010 16:43 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

Hi Aiken,

'Saw' and 'had seen' would both work here.

Alan
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Re: Had seen #5 (permalink) Mon May 30, 2011 14:51 pm   Re: Had seen
 

Alan wrote:
Hi Gella,

The best way I can explain this is by saying that the refusing to go (the non going if you like) was after the seeing. His actual words were: I refuse to go until I have seen and this converts in reported speech as: He refused to go until he had seen. Another way is to say: He didn't go until he had seen ..

Alan

Good explanation Alan!
Maddy
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until he had seen vs. until he saw #6 (permalink) Mon May 30, 2011 15:18 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

Hi Maddy,

Glad you liked it!

Alan
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until he had seen vs. until he saw #7 (permalink) Mon May 30, 2011 15:18 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

Hi Maddy,

Glad you liked it!

Alan
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until he had seen vs. until he saw #8 (permalink) Tue Sep 27, 2011 14:48 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

The Past Perfect can be use with till/until and before to emphasize the complection or expected complection of an action. For till/untill the simple past action may precede the past perfect action. So can it be that:
first he refused to go, and later saw all the paintings? I think so. But Mr Alan said completely different/opposite, so how to differ which action was the first and the second?

many,many thanks
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1583

until he had seen vs. until he saw #9 (permalink) Tue Sep 27, 2011 14:49 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

The Past Perfect can be use with till/until and before to emphasize the complection or expected complection of an action. For till/untill the simple past action may precede the past perfect action. So can it be that:
first he refused to go, and later saw all the paintings? I think so. But Mr Alan said completely different/opposite, so how to differ which action was the first and the second?

many,many thanks
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1583

until he had seen vs. until he saw #10 (permalink) Tue Sep 27, 2011 14:51 pm   until he had seen vs. until he saw
 

The Past Perfect can be used with till/until and before to emphasize the complection or expected complection of an action. For till/untill the simple past action may precede the past perfect action. So can it be that:
first he refused to go, and later saw all the paintings? I think so. But Mr Alan said completely different/opposite, so how to differ which action was the first and the second?

many,many thanks
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1583

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