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Expression: to be afraid of



 
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Expression: to be afraid of #1 (permalink) Mon Feb 06, 2006 4:15 am   Expression: to be afraid of
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #75 "Adjective Prepositions Constructions", question 2

My son is afraid ......... the dark.

(a) from
(b) on
(c) of
(d) by

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #75 "Adjective Prepositions Constructions", answer 2

My son is afraid of the dark.

Correct answer: (c) of
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my son is afraid by the dark
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Afraid of #2 (permalink) Mon Feb 06, 2006 8:41 am   Afraid of
 

Dear learner,
The correct preposition to go with "afraid" is OF: to be afraid of...... BY isn't correct.
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Afraid #3 (permalink) Mon Feb 06, 2006 9:53 am   Afraid
 

Hi deleted,

You might like to know other words related to afraid of -

Charlie is frightened of flying

Charlie has a fear of flying

If you introduce the preposition by, you then give the idea of the passive:

The children were frightened by the thunder and lightning. This means the thunder and lightning made the children afraid or frightened them.

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from vs of #4 (permalink) Wed Oct 24, 2012 15:08 pm   from vs of
 

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Alan, could you give me any explanation about the difference between from vs of? For example: I don`t know if the following sentence is correct or not: I am retired OF Banco do Brasil or FROM Banco do Brasil.
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Expression: to be afraid of #5 (permalink) Wed Oct 24, 2012 16:37 pm   Expression: to be afraid of
 

Hi,

Very broadly you could generalise and say that 'from' indicates separation/away and 'of' gives the idea of possession. That of course is a very simple explanation as both prepositions are used in many different ways. Using that broad summary you would have to say: retire/retired from.

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