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trouble vs. problem



 
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Expression: "We haven't got any left" | The sea was very calm?
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trouble vs. problem #1 (permalink) Tue Feb 07, 2006 15:19 pm   trouble vs. problem
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #58 "Chit Chat: At the restaurant", question 10

Diner: Right then. If it's not too much .......... Please bring me a cup of coffee.

(a) difficulty
(b) problem
(c) hardship
(d) trouble

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #58 "Chit Chat: At the restaurant", answer 10

Diner: Right then. If it's not too much trouble. Please bring me a cup of coffee.

Correct answer: (d) trouble

Your answer was: incorrect
Diner: Right then. If it's not too much problem. Please bring me a cup of coffee.
_________________________

Why the answer is 'trouble' rather than 'problem'?
Thanks for your explanation.

Elif
Elif_
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Trouble vs. problem #2 (permalink) Wed Feb 08, 2006 11:54 am   Trouble vs. problem
 

.
Problem is a countable noun; trouble can be, as here, uncountable.

(The phrase, 'if it's not too much trouble', is also a set expresssion.)
.
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Trouble vs. problem #3 (permalink) Sun Nov 11, 2007 17:45 pm   Trouble vs. problem
 

why don't we use "differenty"?
thank you.
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Trouble vs. problem #4 (permalink) Sun Nov 11, 2007 22:59 pm   Trouble vs. problem
 

.
'Differenty' is not an English word.
.
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trouble vs. problem #5 (permalink) Sun Dec 16, 2007 16:19 pm   trouble vs. problem
 

Sorry, I mean why don't we use "difficulty"?
Sorry once again.
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trouble vs. problem #6 (permalink) Sun Dec 16, 2007 23:45 pm   trouble vs. problem
 

.
'Difficulty' would fit grammatically, but the common expression is 'if it's not too much trouble...'.
.
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trouble vs. problem #7 (permalink) Fri Aug 15, 2008 22:59 pm   trouble vs. problem
 

Elif_ wrote:
English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #58 "Chit Chat: At the restaurant", question 10

Diner: Right then. If it's not too much .......... Please bring me a cup of coffee.

(a) difficulty
(b) problem
(c) hardship
(d) trouble

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #58 "Chit Chat: At the restaurant", answer 10

Diner: Right then. If it's not too much trouble. Please bring me a cup of coffee.

Correct answer: (d) trouble

Your answer was: incorrect
Diner: Right then. If it's not too much problem. Please bring me a cup of coffee.
_________________________

Why the answer is 'trouble' rather than 'problem'?
Thanks for your explanation.

Elif
the popular answer , I think,should be "if it isn't a problem i.....
Amiranow
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trouble vs. problem #8 (permalink) Sat Aug 16, 2008 8:58 am   trouble vs. problem
 

Hi Amiranow,

I'm not sure why you say:
Quote:
the popular answer , I think,should be "if it isn't a problem .....
. That is just another way of saying: If it's not too much trouble. Then again you could say: If it's not too much of a problem. There are several other ways of saying the same thing.

Alan
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trouble vs. problem #9 (permalink) Sat Aug 16, 2008 9:09 am   trouble vs. problem
 

Alan wrote:
There are several other ways of saying the same thing.

Yeah, here are a few ways you might deal with (no) problems:

That's not an issue.
Not a bother.
No sweat.
Fine!
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