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Object vs. subject



 
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Object vs. subject #1 (permalink) Sat Feb 18, 2006 6:35 am   Object vs. subject
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #79 "Pronouns: who, whose, whom, which", question 1

This is the teacher ......... told me my son has been misbehaving in class.

(a) which
(b) whose
(c) whom
(d) who

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #79 "Pronouns: who, whose, whom, which", answer 1

This is the teacher who told me my son has been misbehaving in class.

Correct answer: (d) who
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how do i know it is subjet objet
object vs. subject

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Subject object #2 (permalink) Sat Feb 18, 2006 10:19 am   Subject object
 

Hi,

Simply put, the subject is usually the word that does something and the object is the word receiving what is done. In the sentence:

Quote:
This is the teacher ......... told me my son has been misbehaving in class.

teacher is the subject, told is the verb and the word receiving what is done/told is me, which is the object. In this sntence the missing pronoun is who.

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Object vs. subject #3 (permalink) Tue Oct 16, 2012 17:25 pm   Object vs. subject
 

Hi Alan,
Why didn't you use "the definite article" before "class"?
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Object vs. subject #4 (permalink) Tue Oct 16, 2012 17:41 pm   Object vs. subject
 

Untaught1988 wrote:
Hi Alan,
Why didn't you use "the definite article" before "class"?

This is the teacher who told me my son has been misbehaving in class.

Yes, the 'the' is necessary, as the speaker means the class of the teacher.

However, when you analyse the sentence and put it in the direct speech, you get

This is the teacher. He told me, "Your son has been misbehaving in the class"

Now, when you combine them, you get

This is the teacher who told me, "Your son has been misbehaving in the class."

Further, when you report it, you get

This is the teacher who told me that my son had been misbehaving in the class.

(This is, usually, the version in the reported or indirect speech).

[There are typos and slips in the questions, very rarely though.]
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Object vs. subject #5 (permalink) Tue Oct 16, 2012 19:15 pm   Object vs. subject
 

Sorry, you are mistaken.

The 'the' is not necessary, as can be seen from the original. 'Class' is used there as a general term for an organised time when students meet their teacher.

It certainly has nothing to do with 'the class of the teacher'
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Object vs. subject #6 (permalink) Tue Oct 16, 2012 19:54 pm   Object vs. subject
 

Yes indeed - pipped at the post. I was on the point of pointing out your misinformation on this, THL. I'll also point out that there is nothing wrong with the present perfect 'has'. 'Has been behaving' chimes perfectly well with 'This is the teacher'.

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Object vs. subject #7 (permalink) Tue Oct 16, 2012 22:06 pm   Object vs. subject
 

It's a bit like 'in future' instead of 'in the future' although most Americans probably say that 'in future' sounds wrong. However, I hear it at the BBC all the time.

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Object vs. subject #8 (permalink) Wed Oct 17, 2012 0:49 am   Object vs. subject
 

haha, you are correct there Torsten - the same as "I was in hospital" - sounds very odd! I need to restrain myself from "correcting" this usage in the TOEFL essays.
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Object vs. subject #9 (permalink) Wed Oct 17, 2012 5:20 am   Object vs. subject
 

Thank you, Torsten, Alan and Bev, for your clarifying notes.

Alan, I agree with you especially when we do not know whether the boy has discontinued his misbehaviour in class.

It's really interesting to learn the nuances of usage through these discussions with native speakers.
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Object vs. subject #10 (permalink) Wed Oct 17, 2012 6:29 am   Object vs. subject
 

Torsten wrote:
It's a bit like 'in future' instead of 'in the future' although most Americans probably say that 'in future' sounds wrong. However, I hear it at the BBC all the time.

In sentences conveying a warning/admonition the phrase 'in future' is often found.
Compare and contrast:
1. It is in your own interest that you do not repeat this mistake in future.
2. A far-sighted policy may serve many generations in the future.
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