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Hear vs listen


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ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Meaning of 'one track mind' | Tenses
listening exercises
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Hear vs listen #1 (permalink) Mon Sep 13, 2004 7:26 am   Hear vs listen
 

Dear teachers,
I am considering when I should I use the verbs listen to and hear.
What is the difference between them? Thanks a lot!

Test No. incompl/elem-4 "Listen/Hear", question 3

Can you ......... me all right over there because you are rather a long way away?

(a) listening
(b) hearing
(c) listen
(d) hear

Test No. incompl/elem-4 "Listen/Hear", answer 3

Can you hear me all right over there because you are rather a long way away?

Correct answer: (d) hear

Your answer was: incorrect
Can you listen me all right over there because you are rather a long way away?

Please let me know the difference.

Sam
Sam
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Listen and hear #2 (permalink) Mon Sep 13, 2004 9:26 am   Listen and hear
 

Dear Sam,

Please take a look at this:

The verb «to hear» means to be aware of sounds in your ears, so when you there is a sound (for example the radio is on) and you receive that sound through your ears.

That verb «to listen (to)» means to pay attention to somebody/something that you can hear. So when you listen to something or somebody you make an effort to hear it or them. When you hear something you usually don't have to make an effort — it just happens (provided your ears are intact of course.)

BTW: Many thanks for including the particular question you are referring to as well as a descriptive headline — this will help other forum members to navigate. Also, it's good you have added your picture — now we know who Sam is. Thanks

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Listen and hear #3 (permalink) Thu Feb 16, 2006 9:46 am   Listen and hear
 

Can you explain me the meaning of the sentence?
Thanks.
evren
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Hear #4 (permalink) Thu Feb 16, 2006 10:15 am   Hear
 

Hi Ervren,

I assume you mean this sentence:

Quote:
Can you hear me all right over there because you are rather a long way away?

Let us imagine someone is giving a talk in a hall and wants to know whether the people at the back of the hall (who are rather a long way away) can hear him - that means are able to understand what he is saying while he is giving a talk.

Alan
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Hear vs listen #5 (permalink) Fri Mar 03, 2006 21:59 pm   Hear vs listen
 

Thank you for your nice explanation. I thought the correct answer was hear! But after I had read your explanation, I discovered that I was mistaken and that I had to choose listen!
Thank you again.
visitor
Guest





Listen vs. hear #6 (permalink) Sat Mar 04, 2006 7:34 am   Listen vs. hear
 

Hi,
Your first assumption was correct, the answer IS "hear" and not "listen". Read the sentence again:
"Can you hear me all right over there because you are rather a long way away?"
If this might be of a little help to you when you use listen, you need the preposition to. We usually say LISTEN TO. Here are some examples:
I'm listening to the radio now.
Are you listening to me? (I'm talking to you and I want to know if you pay attention to what I'm telling you.)
Daniela
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Listen vs. hear #7 (permalink) Sun Apr 02, 2006 20:16 pm   Listen vs. hear
 

Daniela wrote:
Hi,
Your first assumption was correct, the answer IS "hear" and not "listen". Read the sentence again:
"Can you hear me all right over there because you are rather a long way away?"
If this might be of a little help to you when you use listen, you need the preposition to. We usually say LISTEN TO. Here are some examples:
I'm listening to the radio now.
Are you listening to me? (I'm talking to you and I want to know if you pay attention to what I'm telling you.)
Daniela

Hi
what is the meaning of " we are rather a long way away"? actually meaning of rather....
thanks
Guest






Hear vs listen #8 (permalink) Thu Jul 31, 2008 22:02 pm   Hear vs listen
 

Hi, every one

Hi every one of you!! I think that the explanation Daniella Gave, is the key toi understand and use correctly the word Listen an Hear. I listen to the News every morning, but sometime I do not hear them clearly.
Gracias a los Maestros Thank you to all the teachers.
Ed.

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Hear vs listen #9 (permalink) Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:50 am   Hear vs listen
 

I think is more deeper than hear. When you listening, it involves understanding to what was spoken to you. While hearing or the word hear only only involves the function of your ear. You can hear but never perceiving. Thats what I can tell to that. Hope that I contribute something. Goodbye!
Richard_11
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Joined: 01 Aug 2008
Posts: 7

Hear vs listen #10 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:11 am   Hear vs listen
 

I've done the test Listen vs. Hear and my score was 8 out of ten at first attempt.
One of my mistakes was :
At exercise 5:
I am listening to the concert
instead of
I listen to the concert every Monday.

Could you tell me more about this two time forms. More exactly i would like a reference to the words which are used with present simple and which are used with present continuous.

The other mistake was at exercise 4:
I hear what you are saying
I've put "listen"
Why isn't it correct?
I think I can listen to something(hear actively) without changing my mind related to that thing.

Julia
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Hear vs listen #11 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:28 am   Hear vs listen
 

Hi Julia,

When you do something regularly as in the sentence 'every Monday', you would use a 'simple' form. It could be present or it could be past = I listen/I listened.

'I hear what you are saying' means I understand/follow what you are saying. We don't usually use verbs of the senses in the continuous form because they 'function' all the time and don't need a continuous form because they are 'continuous' already in meaning. Again 'listen' is a particular action - it means that you not only hear but you also follow closely what you hear. Again if you use 'listen' with an object, it would have to be used with the preposition 'to'. I listen to what you are saying. But that sentence would suggest you do that on a regular basis. 'I hear what you are saying' is idiomatic use of 'hear' to mean I fully understand what you are saying.

I hope that's not too much of a mouthful and makes sense.

Alan
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Hear vs listen #12 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 13:23 pm   Hear vs listen
 

Juliafekete wrote:
I've done the test Listen vs. Hear and my score was 8 out of ten at first attempt.
One of my mistakes was :
At exercise 5:
I am listening to the concert
instead of
I listen to the concert every Monday.

Could you tell me more about this two time forms. More exactly i would like a reference to the words which are used with present simple and which are used with present continuous.

The other mistake was at exercise 4:
I hear what you are saying
I've put "listen"
Why isn't it correct?
I think I can listen to something(hear actively) without changing my mind related to that thing.

Julia

Hi Julia,

Please use the "Teacher's Explanations" links next to each question instead of rewriting the sentences: How to ask a question?

Many thanks,
Torsten

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Hear vs listen #13 (permalink) Fri Sep 05, 2008 12:29 pm   Hear vs listen
 

Hy Torsten!

Thank you for the suggestion. I'll take it in consideration.

Julia
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Joined: 30 Jul 2008
Posts: 70
Location: Targu Mures Romania

Hear vs listen #14 (permalink) Fri Sep 05, 2008 12:44 pm   Hear vs listen
 

Hy Alan!

Thank you for your explanation. It isn't so much. But usually when i solve a test i can't think at all of the aspects of grammar.
I've learned about verbs of sense before but than i didn't realise that it is about that.
I think I need more practice.

Julia
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Joined: 30 Jul 2008
Posts: 70
Location: Targu Mures Romania

To listen vs to hear #15 (permalink) Wed Oct 29, 2008 2:23 am   To listen vs to hear
 

Hi Torsten,

I recognize that this subjetc is a little dificult to me, I'm many sorry but I don't understand yet. I really want to know about it indeed.

To "listen" is a voluntary acton and to "hear" is a involuntary? Is it true? I'm right?

Thanks for your help.

best wishes

Matias
Matias
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Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 17

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