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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little



 
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #1 (permalink) Tue Mar 14, 2006 20:38 pm   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #80 "Some, any, few, little", question 7

There are ......... people trying to go to the U2 concert this weekend.

(a) many
(b) much
(c) a little
(d) any

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #80 "Some, any, few, little", answer 7

There are many people trying to go to the U2 concert this weekend.

Correct answer: (a) many
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sir please give me explanation and and answer for this question

S.Mathan
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #2 (permalink) Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:08 am   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

Hi,
You have found the correct answer which is many.
You can't use much in this sentence because the noun "people" is countable and we use much only with uncountable nouns. Consider these:
much money
much time
much water

but

many people
many books
many shops, etc.

A little is also used with uncountable nouns with the meaning of "not much but enough".

Any is used in negative and interrogative sentences, so it doesn't fit here. Here is an example:

- Have you got any money with you? (any in questions)
- Yes, I have a little, I can pay for the coffee. (My money is enough to pay the bill.)

Hope this helps.
Daniela
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #3 (permalink) Sat Dec 19, 2009 23:49 pm   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

Hi

Do we say 'the peoples of Europe' because it's referring to peoples from different nationalities?

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Ali
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #4 (permalink) Sun Dec 20, 2009 0:04 am   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

peoples is equivalent to nationalities. But people itself is the plural of person.

So, one person, two people.
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #5 (permalink) Tue Feb 15, 2011 1:48 am   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

There are many people trying to go to the U2 concert this weekend.

I have found that the correct answer was many, but I would like to know if it wouldn't be better to use a lot of instead of many. I know this choice was not given in the exercise, but if I remember correctly, a lot of is to be used in affermative sentences whereas many is to be used in interrogative and negative sentences. Is it correct?

Thanks a lot for your help.
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #6 (permalink) Tue Feb 15, 2011 4:48 am   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

Generally, a native speaker would use either form interchangeably, with no difference in meaning, though 'many' is the more formal response.

There are many people trying to go to the U2 concert this weekend.
There are a lot of people trying to go to the U2 concert this weekend.
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #7 (permalink) Sat Dec 03, 2011 14:15 pm   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

What's the difference
between 'some' and 'a few'?
For example:
I have got some tins.
I have got a few tins.
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Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little #8 (permalink) Sat Dec 03, 2011 15:01 pm   Many vs. some/ much vs. many/ few vs. a little
 

The only difference is that 'some' can indicate more than 'a few' can.

a few - an indefinite number but generally considered to be around 3 or 4.
some - an indefinite number more than 1 but up to a much higher range than 3 or 4.
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