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Commence vs. Start



 
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Commence vs. Start #1 (permalink) Sat Mar 25, 2006 13:38 pm   Commence vs. Start
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #123 "English tense explanations", question 3

The main question is knowing where you .........?

(a) commence
(b) initiate
(c) start
(d) activate

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #123 "English tense explanations", answer 3

The main question is knowing where you start?

Correct answer: (c) start

Your answer was: incorrect
The main question is knowing where you commence?
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I would like to know the way of using of above werbs

Lopez
Lopez
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Start/commence #2 (permalink) Sat Mar 25, 2006 20:23 pm   Start/commence
 

Hi,

Both verbs indicate the beginning of something. Commence is often used in an official sense as in: Your pay/pension/allowance will commence on the 14th day of the month. You need the more general sense in this sentence and start is the best verb as in: When do you start yout new job? I started my essay this morning.

Alan
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Commence vs. Start #3 (permalink) Thu Sep 29, 2011 13:28 pm   Commence vs. Start
 

Hi,
I'm confused about 'is knowing', I thought that this verb: know can't occur in the continous form, so please tell me what the sentence mean,

thank you very much
Saneta
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Joined: 11 Sep 2008
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