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Difference between time and duration



 
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Difference between time and duration #1 (permalink) Sun Apr 09, 2006 5:03 am   Difference between time and duration
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #45 "Speaking: At the Supermarket", question 7

We have to inform our customers that the store will be closing in half an hour's ..........

(a) o'clock
(b) time
(c) hour
(d) duration

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #45 "Speaking: At the Supermarket", answer 7

We have to inform our customers that the store will be closing in half an hour's time.

Correct answer: (b) time

Your answer was: incorrect
We have to inform our customers that the store will be closing in half an hour's duration.
_________________________

Mr Alan

Would you explain the difference between "time" and "duration" here?

Thanks a lot in advance

Stone
Stone
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Time/duration #2 (permalink) Sun Apr 09, 2006 9:28 am   Time/duration
 

Hi Stone,

Time is a general word than can be a period or indeed give details of the hours of the day. Duration is a word describing a defined period of time.

Look at these:

During the time (not a defined period) I lived in the country I managed to learn the language.

Throughout the duration (describing the period from start to finish)of my stay I didn't manage to understand the language.

Alan
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Alan Townend

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In half an hour's time #3 (permalink) Sun Apr 09, 2006 11:50 am   In half an hour's time
 

Quote:
We have to inform our customers that the store will be closing in half an hour's time.

There's something I've been meaning to ask you. Would you say that the phrase 'in half an hour's time' is more used than 'in half an hour' and/or better sounding or is it just another option?
Conchita
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Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Half an hour #4 (permalink) Sun Apr 09, 2006 12:30 pm   Half an hour
 

Hi Conchita,

To me both in half an hour and in half an hour's time are as good as each other. I suppose I chose in half an hour's time in this sentence to suggest someone speaking officially - making it sound slightly more authoritative. It's like the friendly invigilator in an examination who says: Well, you've got half an hour left. And then there would be the po-faced invigilator who would say: The examination will conclude in half an hour's time.

Alan
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Po-faced #5 (permalink) Sun Apr 09, 2006 12:45 pm   Po-faced
 

Alan wrote:
Hi Conchita,

To me both in half an hour and in half an hour's time are as good as each other. I suppose I chose in half an hour's time in this sentence to suggest someone speaking officially - making it sound slightly more authoritative. It's like the friendly invigilator in an examination who says: Well, you've got half an hour left. And then there would be the po-faced invigilator who would say: The examination will conclude in half an hour's time.

Alan

Po-faced? :lol: In German, 'Po' or 'Popo' is children's or familiar language for 'bottom', i.e. 'bum'! I had never heard this adjective and am not about to forget it!

Thank you for your 'lightning retort' and, especially, for giving it your very personal and unique hallmark.
Conchita
Language Coach


Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Difference between time and duration #6 (permalink) Sat Jul 11, 2009 16:42 pm   Difference between time and duration
 

in half an hour's time= in half an hour?
thanks.
Saneta
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 1583

Difference between time and duration #7 (permalink) Sat Jul 11, 2009 17:18 pm   Difference between time and duration
 

Hi,

Both mean the same.

Alan
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English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Passive Voice
Alan
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Alan Townend

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Posts: 17284
Location: UK

making it sound(s) slightly more authoritative #8 (permalink) Sat Jan 16, 2010 5:52 am   making it sound(s) slightly more authoritative
 

The sentence is missing (s): making it sound(s) slightly more authoritative.
Watie
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 11 Nov 2009
Posts: 162
Location: Indonesia

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