Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to temporarily cease working as a protest; to impress
remark
initiate
encourage
strike
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Get on well with each other | Difference between 'those days' and 'these days'
listening exercises
Message
Author
The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #1 (permalink) Thu Jun 23, 2011 5:54 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

Please help me explain the meanings of following sentences:

1. Being at the shoulder of people who are making the decisions is a vastly different story than being in a position to read magazine.
2. I'm not going to paint you in the best light.

Thank you very much!
Galilom2002
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 177

The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #2 (permalink) Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:10 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

1. Being at the shoulder of people who are making the decisions is a vastly different story than being in a position to read magazine. = Working with decision-makers is much better than reading about decision-making.

2. I'm not going to paint you in the best light. -- I'm not going to present a very good image of you.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

Learn some cool expressions in the following cool storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Start exploring the English language today! Subscribe to free email English course
The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #3 (permalink) Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:18 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

Thank you very much, Sir!
Galilom2002
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 177

The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #4 (permalink) Fri Jul 01, 2011 7:59 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

Dear Sir!
I have another question as follows:
Does 'All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy' has the same meaning with 'All work and much play'?
Thanks!
Galilom2002
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 177

The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #5 (permalink) Fri Jul 01, 2011 8:02 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

That should be pretty obvious, Galilom - 'no' means 'no' and 'much' means 'a lot of'. They are quite opposite in meaning. In any case, it is a fixed saying.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #6 (permalink) Fri Jul 01, 2011 8:17 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

So 2 above sentences means 'We should work and rest properly'?????
Galilom2002
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 177

The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'? #7 (permalink) Fri Jul 01, 2011 8:31 am   The meaning of 'paint you in the best light'?
 

No. I have already said that your idea for changing the sentence is not the same meaning at all.

'All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy' does mean, however, that without time off from work, a person becomes both bored and boring. A balance should be reached.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

Display posts from previous:   
Get on well with each other | Difference between 'those days' and 'these days'
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
spend time to do something or spend time doing something"help keep" and "help to keep"journalists would follow him...can not understand ?diffence between finish up and finish offend up vs. close upShouldn't the preposition be 'an' instead of 'a' before euphemism?How can I make my own sentences?Idiom: to tear one's hair outPoked my eye outWho(m) does that car belong to?Hallucinating vs daydreamingDon't mention it

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail