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Phrasal verb 'to run out'



 
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Phrasal verb 'to run out' #1 (permalink) Sun Apr 23, 2006 15:21 pm   Phrasal verb 'to run out'
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #102 "Phrasal verbs", question 2

We've run ......... of sugar. Could you please buy some more?

(a) down on
(b) away from
(c) on with
(d) out of

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #102 "Phrasal verbs", answer 2

We've run out of of sugar. Could you please buy some more?

Correct answer: (d) out of
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i couldn,t understand this question

ahmad
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To run out #2 (permalink) Sun Apr 23, 2006 17:04 pm   To run out
 

We've run out of sugar. Could you please buy some more?

The phrasal verb 'to run out' means 'to go short'. 'We have run out of sugar' has the meaning of 'there is no sugar left'.
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Phrasal verb 'to run out' #3 (permalink) Sat Sep 15, 2007 12:19 pm   Phrasal verb 'to run out'
 

ahmad wrote:
English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #102 "Phrasal verbs", question 2

We've run ......... of sugar. Could you please buy some more?

(a) down on
(b) away from
(c) on with
(d) out of

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #102 "Phrasal verbs", answer 2

We've run out of of sugar. Could you please buy some more?

Correct answer: (d) out of

I'm afraid there is a mistake in the assignment. The sentence probably should be...
We've run ......... sugar. Could you please buy some more?
...(with the of preposition left out in front of sugar). Otherwise there are two ofs there.

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Phrasal verb 'to run out' #4 (permalink) Sat Sep 15, 2007 13:19 pm   Phrasal verb 'to run out'
 

Thanks, Random.

This typo has been noted and will be corrected soon.
.
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