Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
denial; rejection
refusal
instructor
belief
anticipation
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Money is a non-count noun.



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
One more newcomer… | Meaning of 'ape'
listening exercises
Message
Author
Money is a non-count noun. #1 (permalink) Tue Sep 06, 2011 2:52 am   Money is a non-count noun.
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #213 "Non-Count and Count Nouns (2)", question 2

......... is a non-count noun. We use this to buy goods and to pay for services.

(a) Bill
(b) Card
(c) Money
(d) Bank

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #213 "Non-Count and Count Nouns (2)", answer 2

Money is a non-count noun. We use this to buy goods and to pay for services.

Correct answer: (c) Money

Your answer was: incorrect
Card is a non-count noun. We use this to buy goods and to pay for services.
_________________________

How money is non-count noun? please explain.
Anushila
You can meet me at english-test.net


Joined: 01 Feb 2011
Posts: 53

Money is a non-count noun. #2 (permalink) Tue Sep 06, 2011 14:17 pm   Money is a non-count noun.
 

Your sentense should read:
How come money is a non-count noun?

Well, as many things in English, it can't be explained. You'll just have to learn this fact.

We say "how much money do I owe you?" (not: how many)
Or "that way you'll lose less money." (not: fewer)
Or "money doesn't grow on trees." (a well-known saying)
_________________
"He who tries to establish his point by much yelling shows that his reasoning is weak"
-Jodi Ann Arias
Our Tort System
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 3886
Location: The big apple

In this story you'll learn everything about the passive voiceEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Sign up for FREE and explore English! Click to subscribe to email English course
Money is a non-count noun. #3 (permalink) Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:55 am   Money is a non-count noun.
 

'Money' is an uncountable noun. This is because we cannot say, "1 money, 2 money, etc."

Yes, it's true, we can count money in the sense that we can say, "1 dollar, 2 dollars, etc." But we are counting 'dollar', not 'money'. Therefore, 'dollar' makes money countable, so 'dollar' is a countable noun.

Countable nouns are associated with the notion of 'completeness'. A living chicken is a unity because it is complete (normally) we can distinguish one chicken from another one, so we can count it, we can say a chicken or one chicken. But what happens when we refer to the food, the flesh? In that case chicken becomes 'matter', 'substance' with different shapes and weights it loses its identity. It ceases to be a unity. We say 'I had chicken for lunch.' when chicken is the food we ate. We would say 'I had a chicken for lunch.' to mean that we ate the whole animal, which is possible but not very likely.

The thing with money in its general sense is that it is an abstract notion. Money is not thought of as a unity in itself. We do not count one money, two moneys. When we say we count money we mean that we count currency which is the measurement for money. We count one dollar, two dollars, three dollars and so on...

But maybe someone could explain why and in which situations the plural form 'moneys' is used. I heard that a couple of times. It is obviously an exceptional case but I would like to know its meaning.

I hope this helps.
Mojo7301
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 07 Sep 2011
Posts: 12
Location: India

Display posts from previous:   
One more newcomer… | Meaning of 'ape'
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
Test incompl/inter-295, User's Answer 4for startersall the time he's taking it all in.I have a bad coldat harvest timeDid you hearcould you explain to me the difference between bring to and bring overMeaning of eagerDifference between I used to and I was used to?Meaning of "executive assistant"Meaning of striding?Less expensiveTalk to vs. talk about

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail