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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans



 
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #1 (permalink) Fri Apr 28, 2006 16:22 pm   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

English Synonym, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #63 "Synonyms for adapt", question 4

I don't want to ......... my plans to yours again!

(a) accommodate
(b) change
(c) fit
(d) transform

English Synonym, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #63 "Synonyms for adapt", answer 4

I don't want to accommodate my plans to yours again!

Correct answer: (a) accommodate

Your answer was: incorrect
I don't want to fit my plans to yours again!
_________________________

Explain to me, why accommodate?

Kolombina
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #2 (permalink) Mon May 01, 2006 13:22 pm   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

Hi Kolombina

My personal opinion is that the word 'fit' could also be used in this sentence. The meanings are similar. But the word 'accommodate' has the additional sense of doing or changing something for the benefit of someone else.

Amy
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #3 (permalink) Wed Jul 29, 2009 13:23 pm   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

what is transform ?
ndishena
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #4 (permalink) Tue Dec 15, 2009 21:25 pm   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

I don't want to change my plans to yours again!

In my opinion this would be the correct answer for this question, as it is closer to how we speak English, and generally 'accommodate' would be used in a positive statement such as 'Yes I can accommodate that idea', not in a negative one such as above.
Mickhael
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #5 (permalink) Mon May 10, 2010 11:41 am   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

I think accommodate has nothing with negative forms, 'accommodate ' suggests a concession or a compromise and subordinates one thing to the requirement of another as it mentioned in the sentence,so 'accommodate' is the correct answer.
Nabilchamlal
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #6 (permalink) Sun Apr 15, 2012 11:16 am   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

I found this explanation on Cambridge online dictionary.
I want to share what I've found with you:
accommodate yourself
to change yourself or your behaviour to suit another person or new conditions
Some find it hard to accommodate themselves to the new working conditions.
Gsheasha
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"accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans #7 (permalink) Wed Apr 09, 2014 16:46 pm   "accommodate my plans" vs. fit my plans
 

I get it.
Accommodate (yourself) to something means: to change your attitudes and behaviour in order to deal with a new situation.

Synonyms or related words for this sense of accommodate are:
To change your opinion, attitudes or behaviour: change your mind, see reason/sense, adapt, revise, move on, renounce, come round, capitulate, move with the times, turn against etc...
Mickhael
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Joined: 03 Dec 2009
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