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"turn in" vs. "turn up"



 
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"turn in" vs. "turn up" #1 (permalink) Sun Apr 30, 2006 19:23 pm   "turn in" vs. "turn up"
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #200 "Phrasal Verbs (T to W)", question 2

Ethan asked his girlfriend to ......... the music so he could clearly hear the music they were listening to in the car.

(a) turn over
(b) turn up
(c) turn in

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #200 "Phrasal Verbs (T to W)", answer 2

Ethan asked his girlfriend to turn up the music so he could clearly hear the music they were listening to in the car.

Correct answer: (b) turn up
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"turn in" vs. "turn up"

Hookis Lee
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"turn in" vs. "turn up" #2 (permalink) Sun Apr 30, 2006 23:57 pm   "turn in" vs. "turn up"
 

.
It is common for phrasal verbs to carry a number of meanings. For these:

Turn in:

verb: make an entrance by turning from a road (Example: "Turn in after you see the gate")
verb: go to bed in order to sleep (Example: "I usually turn in at midnight")
verb: carry out (performances)
verb: to surrender someone or something to another

Turn up:

verb: discover the location of; determine the place of; find by searching or examining
verb: be shown or be found to be
verb: appear or become visible; make a showing
verb: bend or lay so that one part covers the other (Example: "Turn up your collar")
verb: find by digging in the ground

Turn over:

verb: do business worth a certain amount of money
verb: cause to move around a center so as to show another side of
verb: move by turning over or rotating (Example: "Turn over on your left side")
verb: turn from an upright or normal position
verb: turn upside down, or throw so as to reverse (Example: "Turn over the pancakes")
verb: cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
verb: think about carefully; weigh
verb: turn up, loosen, or remove earth (Example: "Turn over the soil for aeration")
verb: place into the hands or custody of
.
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"Turn up" #3 (permalink) Mon May 01, 2006 23:39 pm   "Turn up"
 

Hello,
In this case, the phrasal verb "turn up" is the right choice because someone in the car wants to hear the music better - to increase the volume of a song.
"Turn up" is the right choice because 'up' in many phrasal verb cases, means to increase something.
For example, with music - turn 'up' or turn it 'up', with a liquid that you want more of, you could say 'fill it up' or fill 'up.' At the gas station, you could say, I have to fill 'up' or again, fill it 'up.' Some people even say things like "spice 'up' your food with these great chili peppers."
I hope that helps.

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