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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'


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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #1 (permalink) Sat May 06, 2006 15:07 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #33 "Responses (6)", question 2

John: 'I am most grateful.'
Sue: '.........'

(a) You are welcoming.
(b) You welcome.
(c) You're welcome.
(d) You are welcomed.

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #33 "Responses (6)", answer 2

John: 'I am most grateful.'
Sue: 'You're welcome.'

Correct answer: (c) You're welcome.

Your answer was: incorrect
John: 'I am most grateful.'
Sue: 'You are welcomed.'
_________________________

hi,
why not you are welcomed

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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #2 (permalink) Sat May 06, 2006 15:38 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

In English there is such a combination "to be welcome"which doesn't require a passive form.It's an interjection but regarding your sentence I'm inclined to suppose that it is a sinonym of"not at all""never mention it"It's just my humble opinion,and nothing more :)
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #3 (permalink) Sat May 06, 2006 17:28 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hi Feodor

"I'm most grateful" is similar in meaning to "Thank you very much".
And a standard response to "Thank you" is "You're welcome."

As Pamela mentioned, "You are welcomed" is a passive formation of the verb "to welcome". It's a little difficult for me to think of a good example in which "You are welcomed" would be used, but here is what comes to mind as a possibility:

Although you visit them every single day, you are always welcomed into their home as if it had been years since the last visit.

pamela wrote:
I'm inclined to suppose that it is a synonym of"not at all""never mention it"

Hi Pamela

I agree with "Not at all" as an alternative to "You're welcome". As to the other alternative, I would say "Don't mention it".

Amy
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #4 (permalink) Sat Aug 11, 2012 14:45 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hello,

If you're welcome is synonym with not at all am I right when I think that two right answers are in the test.
Quote:
John: 'I am most grateful.'
Sue: '.........'

Quote:
Can we answer the c. and d. answers ?
c. you're welcome
d you're welcomed

'you're welcome'/not at all/ -is more widely known than you're welcomed, isn't it?

Really I don't understand why we say you're welcomed and not you're welcome?

Regards:
Kati svaby
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #5 (permalink) Sat Aug 11, 2012 15:12 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

'You're welcomed' is incorrect here, Kati.
'You're welcome' is the correct response.
Please see Esl_Expert's answer above yours for an indication of when 'You're welcomed' might be possible. It is highly unlikely that it would be used and it definitely wouldn't be used in response to 'Thank you', 'I am grateful', etc.
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #6 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 7:25 am   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hello Bez,

I Wrote my letter after reading ESL_Expert's letter. The piece dropped to me what is the difference between 'You are welcome ' and 'you are welcomed' and I concluded this what I have written.
I think that if I say sb for example: When do you want to some to see us ? You know you are always welcomed in our place.

Regards:
Kati
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #7 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 10:16 am   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hi Kati,

Your usage of 'You know you are always welcomed...' is correct with the meaning 'you are always given a warm welcome'.
You could also say 'You know you are always welcome...' with the meaning 'it is always a pleasure to see you and we will greet you warmly'.
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #8 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 10:28 am   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Many thanks, Bez.
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #9 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 10:31 am   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hi Kati,

Your question: When do you want to some to see us ? would most naturally be followed by: You are always welcome to come whenever you like as this doesn't really describe how you will be treated but indicates the offer is always there.
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #10 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 11:34 am   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Many thanks Alan,

Now it is clear.
I can say as a greeting that you can come whenever because you are always welcome .

But if I want to stress my treat to him/her I can say:

You know you can come anywhere because we are always welcomed you.

Is it correct? Or only almost?

Regards:
kati sváby
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #11 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:03 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hi Kati,

I really don't see anything wrong with your original response here:
Quote:
When do you want to some to see us ? You know you are always welcomed in our place.

with the meaning I gave earlier (how you will be treated), though I've already given 'You know you are always welcome' as an alternative (the offer is there), which would be the most natural response.

You now seem to have become more confused about it as your original was far more appropriate and correct than:
Quote:
You know you can come anywhere because we are always welcomed you.

I think you probably mean
You know you can come any time because we will always welcome you.
which is simply a less concise way of saying
'You know you are always welcome'.
or
'You know you are welcome any time'.
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #12 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 13:02 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hi Bez,

Let me ask a last question:
You're welcome -it is a set expression, isn't it?

You're welcomed - is it also a set expression ?

Regards:
Kati
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #13 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 16:11 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

I guess you could define 'you're welcome' as being a set expression, but not 'you're welcomed,' no.
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'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #14 (permalink) Sun Aug 12, 2012 20:51 pm   'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

Hello Bez,

Many thanks for your answer.

Kati
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Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
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Re: 'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome' #15 (permalink) Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:56 am   Re: 'You're welcome' vs. 'You are welcome'
 

HI, can't we use both forms, you are welcome and you're welcome, I think the second one is the abbreviation of firs one,

Yankee wrote:
Hi Feodor H

"I'm most grateful" is similar in meaning to "Thank you very much".
And a standard response to "Thank you" is "You're welcome."

As Pamela mentioned, "You are welcomed" is a passive formation of the verb "to welcome". It's a little difficult for me to think of a good example in which "You are welcomed" would be used, but here is what comes to mind as a possibility:

Although you visit them every single day, you are always welcomed into their home as if it had been years since the last visit.

pamela wrote:
I'm inclined to suppose that it is a synonym of"not at all""never mention it"

Hi Pamela

I agree with "Not at all" as an alternative to "You're welcome". As to the other alternative, I would say "Don't mention it".

Amy
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