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"in last year" vs. "last year"



 
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"in last year" vs. "last year" #1 (permalink) Sat May 06, 2006 15:14 pm   "in last year" vs. "last year"
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #203 "Prepositions of Time and Date (1)", question 5

......... last year, the weather was really bad. This year, the forecast is better.

(a) In
(b) (none)
(c) About

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #203 "Prepositions of Time and Date (1)", answer 5

Last year, the weather was really bad. This year, the forecast is better.

Correct answer: (b) (none)

Your answer was: incorrect
In last year, the weather was really bad. This year, the forecast is better.
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Dear Sir

why not "in last year" here?

thanks a lot in advance

Christina's son
Christina328
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"in last year" vs. "last year" #2 (permalink) Sat May 06, 2006 15:24 pm   "in last year" vs. "last year"
 

Such adverbs of time as"last night","last year","last month"and etc.are used without any preposition.
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Last year etc #3 (permalink) Sat May 06, 2006 23:29 pm   Last year etc
 

Hi Christina's son,
I agree with Pamela that words such as "next, this or last" - when used with "time" - indicate that no preposition is necessary.
So, when you see something like "this month, last year, next week," you don't need a preposition before it.
However, Pamela, I don't think that words such as 'this, last and next' are adverbs of time but rather adjectives because "year' is a noun and not a verb. :)
I hope that helps.
Linda
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Last year etc #4 (permalink) Sun May 07, 2006 12:06 pm   Last year etc
 

Quote:
However, Pamela, I don't think that words such as 'this, last and next' are adverbs of time but rather adjectives because "year' is a noun and not a verb. :)
I hope that helps.
Linda

Linda,when analyising a sentence according to the parts of sentence "last month", "last year" (etc.)stand for adverbial modifiers of time and according to parts of speech,they're adverbs.These adverbs are considered as a single idea while analysing.
Anyway I'd like to know Amy's opinion!
Pamela
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"in last year" vs. "last year" #5 (permalink) Sun May 07, 2006 12:22 pm   "in last year" vs. "last year"
 

Hi Pamela,

I'd agree with you that "time phrases" such as 'last year', 'next month', etc. would be considered adverbial.

Amy
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"in last year" vs. "last year" #6 (permalink) Sun May 07, 2006 12:42 pm   "in last year" vs. "last year"
 

Thanks a lot,Amy !
Pamela
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Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 1269
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