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Silver Bullet?



 
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Silver Bullet? #1 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:17 am   Silver Bullet?
 

Dear Learners,

We all know what bullets are and what they are for.

Do you know what silver bullets are and what they are for?

Certainly, they are not for shooting vampires as you presume.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Silver Bullet? #2 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 7:06 am   Silver Bullet?
 

Hello Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin,

Actually, I do not know. But I have a supposition. Can it be that silver bullets are healthier for their victims? They say that water with any silver thing in it can be preserved for a long time:)

Take care,
Yuri
_________________
Everything is Anything.

Please NO Youtube on "My first steps in English" thread... Yuri Zverev
Yuri Yurinov
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 15 Mar 2009
Posts: 1627
Location: Russia

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Silver Bullet? #3 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 7:19 am   Silver Bullet?
 

Dear Mr. Yuri,

Thank you. But your guess is not quite close to it.

Mr. Putin has the silver bullet.

Kadaffi and Sadam had silver bullets as well. But their silver bullets seemed to defunct.

This is a rarely known idiom.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Silver Bullet? #4 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 7:39 am   Silver Bullet?
 

To Dear Mr. Yuri.

A.**A silver bullet is a complete solution to a large problem, a solution that seems magical.

B. **Yesterday White House National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice testified in public before the commission investigating the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

There is such a sentence in the report of the testimony:

“ She told the panel there was no "silver bullet," or simple solution, that could have prevented the attacks. “

C.**A direct and effortless solution to a problem.

Origin

We now use the term 'silver bullet' to refer to an action which cuts through complexity and provides an immediate solution to a problem. The allusion is to a miraculous fix, otherwise portrayed as 'waving a magic wand'. This figurative use derives from the use of actual silver bullets and the widespread folk belief that they were the only way of killing werewolves or other supernatural beings.

Silver bulletThe most famous user of silver bullets was of course the Lone Ranger. This cowboy series ran from 1933 on radio and later as a highly popular television show. Silver bullets fitted well with the masked hero's miraculous persona. He typically arrived from nowhere, overcame evil and departed, leaving behind only a silver bullet and echoes of 'who was that masked man?'.

The belief in the magical power of silver, especially of weapons made from silver, is very ancient. Book XVI of Horace's Odes has it that the Delphic Oracle advised Philip of Macedonia to 'fight with silver spears'. References to the use of silver bullets date from the late 17th century. An early 19th century citation which specifically mentions the belief in their use as the only way to kill evil supernatural beings is found in Sir Walter Scott's Tales of My Landlord, 1816:

Conspicuous by his black horse and white feather ... the object of aim to everyone, he seemed as if he were impassive to their shots. The superstitious fanatics looked upon him as a man gifted by the Evil Spirit with supernatural means of defence. Many a whig that day loaded his musket with a dollar cut into slugs, in order that a silver bullet (such was their belief) might bring down the persecutor of the holy kirk, on whom lead had no power.

There are numerous examples in 19th century fiction of the efficacy of silver bullets against werewolves, witches, the Devil and all manner of creatures, which were generically called 'uncanny bodies'.

Into the 20th century and the term was adopted in other contexts as meaning a solution to a problem. War bonds with that name were issued in 1914. In 1916, The Times advised the population of the UK to:

"Invest the savings in buying 'Silver Bullets' in the form most suitable and convenient - Exchequer bonds, or through the Post Office Savings Bank."

Silver Bullet cocktails, a solution in a literal sense, were devised a little later. Harry Craddock's Savoy Cocktail Book, 1930, lists the ingredients:

Silver bullet cocktail. {half} Gin. {quarter} Lemon Juice. {quarter} Kummel. Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The expression 'magic bullet' also came into being at around this time. This had a similar meaning to 'silver bullet' but related specifically to highly targeted medical treatments. It was coined by the German scientist Paul Ehrlich in a speech in 1906, using the German word Zauberkugel. This was translated as 'magic bullet' when Ehrlich's work was reported in Science, in August 1924:

"Ehrlich aptly compared them [natural antibodies] to magic bullets, constrained by a charm to fly straight to their specific objective, and to turn aside from anything else in their path."

Oddly, the figurative use of 'silver bullet' that is now commonplace wasn't adopted into general use until well after all of the above, probably in response to the activities of 'that masked man'. The US newspaper The Bedford Gazette included this piece in a September 1951 issue:

"There are those who warn against viewing the atom as a magic weapon... I agree. This is not a silver bullet which can deliver itself or otherwise work military miracles."

I hope you like it.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Silver Bullet? #5 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:26 am   Silver Bullet?
 

To Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin,

It was not my lucky guess:)

Many thanks for your so complete explanation. I am not too big fun of mysterious things but after reading your message I remembered that I have heard something about werewolves and silver bullets. If it were not for you I would have never remembered.

Take care,
Yuri
_________________
Everything is Anything.

Please NO Youtube on "My first steps in English" thread... Yuri Zverev
Yuri Yurinov
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 15 Mar 2009
Posts: 1627
Location: Russia

Silver Bullet? #6 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 15:21 pm   Silver Bullet?
 

Thank you very much Mr. Yuri,

I like this word for it has a little bit of political flavour.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Silver Bullet? #7 (permalink) Sun Mar 25, 2012 16:31 pm   Silver Bullet?
 

Dear Mr. Kyaw,

I have heard this saying before, and it was also mentioned on the news about the increasing gas price issue “No silver bullet on lowering gas prices.”
When I was reading the news, I did not know the exact meaning of the quotation, but I guessed from the context. Thank you for further elaborating the term.

Kind regards,
kk
Kkebe
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 232

Silver Bullet? #8 (permalink) Mon Mar 26, 2012 5:29 am   Silver Bullet?
 

My pleasure KK,
giving is better than receiving?

*“No silver bullet on lowering gas prices.” I've also seen that , beautiful usage to me.

Do you know Real McCoy?

kind regards.

I have
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Silver Bullet? #9 (permalink) Wed Mar 28, 2012 5:04 am   Silver Bullet?
 

Dear Mr.Kway,

Please forgive my late reply to your question.

I have to Google it to find out what the Real McCoy means. According to Wiki, it is a metaphor used by English speakers, meaning "the real thing" or "the genuine article." The original word was "The real MacKay", and first recorded in 1856.

Example, He is the real McCoy.

As always, your kindness is appreciated.

kk
Kkebe
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 232

Silver Bullet? #10 (permalink) Wed Mar 28, 2012 6:18 am   Silver Bullet?
 

Thank you KK. You see English is fun.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

Silver Bullet? #11 (permalink) Sat Mar 31, 2012 19:26 pm   Silver Bullet?
 

Dear Mr. Kyaw,

In reply to “you see English is fun.”

I do not believe English language is fun at all. Maybe, it will be fun when I get it, but right now it is not fun for me. It drives me crazy. Although, I have a feeling that I am getting a little better since I joined the forum. I am always excited to receive a new posting on my phone, whether I am at the school or work. Even at night, the buzz sound I get when I receive messages walk me up, and I still love to read it. It has been really nice.

Here is something, I found to support my opinion that English language is not easy lol

Can you read these right the first time?

The bandage was wound around the wound.
The farm was used to produce produce.
The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.
We must polish the Polish furniture.
He could lead if he would get the lead out.
The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.
Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.
A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.
When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.
I did not object to the object.
The insurance was invalid for the invalid.
There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.
They were too close to the door to close it.
The buck does funny things when the does are present.
A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.
To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.
The wind was too strong to wind the sail.
Upon seeing the tear in the painting, I shed a tear.
I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.
How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?

Let's face it, English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England nor French fries in France. Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat.

We take English for granted, but if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital, ship by truck and send cargo by ship, have noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites? You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out, and in which an alarm goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.

PS. – Why doesn't Buick rhyme with quick?

You lovers of the English language might enjoy this:

There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is UP.

It's easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or toward the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP? At a meeting, why does a topic come UP? Why do we speak UP and why are the officers UP for election and why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report?

We call UP our friends. We use something to brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver, warm UP the leftovers, and clean UP the kitchen. We lock UP the house and some guys fix UP the old car. At other times the little word has real special meaning. People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses. To be dressed is one thing but to be dressed UP is special.

And this UP is confusing: A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP. We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night.

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP. When the sun comes out we say it is clearing UP
When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things UP
When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dry UP

We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP! To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look the word UP in the dictionary. In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4th of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions. If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used. It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don't give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more.

We could go on, but I'll wrap it UP, for now my time is UP; so: Time to shut UP!

Oh… one more thing: What are the first thing you do in the morning and the last thing you do at night? U-P

I believe it was written by Richard Lederer.

I am already exhausted and became dizzy reading through it. I hope that after reading this portion of English language, native speakers will understand how hard the foreign student works to master the language. Alternatively, if they never mastered a foreign language, they will admire how others can master the English league as a second language.

Hello readers, I am not looking for sympathy, just sharing my feelings.

Thank you,

kk
Kkebe
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 232

Silver Bullet? #12 (permalink) Sat Mar 31, 2012 19:29 pm   Silver Bullet?
 

Some of the words were highlighted, but it is not showing on the screen. It would have been easier to read like that. Sorry.
kk
Kkebe
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 232

Silver Bullet? #13 (permalink) Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:52 am   Silver Bullet?
 

Dear KK,

Now I see, you are on board in side the real English Room. I've been there, and it made me crazy as well. But after that I thought I've got an PHD.
So have fun!

I'll be with you again, I'm on a rocket now.

kind regards.
Mr. Kyaw Min Lwin
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 2974

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