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Bulit, Locate, Situate



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Differences between CFR, CPT, DAF and DDP and its menaing | Parts of Speech
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Bulit, Locate, Situate #1 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 15:48 pm   Bulit, Locate, Situate
 

Hello everybody

Although I looked up in a good dictionary I could not find the complete use/ difference between the three words.

Kindly tell the differences between locate, situate and built. For example,

1- My school is situated in the middle of the city.
2- My school is built in the middle of the city.
3- My school is located in the middle of the city.

Thanks

Tom
Tom
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Bulit, Locate, Situate #2 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 17:29 pm   Bulit, Locate, Situate
 

Hi Tom

In your examples, situated and located are both connected with the idea of 'where the school is'.

The word "built" however is has to do with construction.
Therefore I would prefer your second sentence in the past tense (the construction of the school is finished):
My school was built in the middle of the city.

Amy
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Bulit, Locate, Situate #3 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 19:14 pm   Bulit, Locate, Situate
 

Thanks Amy

One more question:

Are Situate and locate interchangeable and to what extent? (I hope 100% :D )

Tom
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Bulit, Locate, Situate #4 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 22:22 pm   Bulit, Locate, Situate
 

Hi Tom

Situated and located are often interchangeable when you want to say where something can be found (such as a house, a building, etc).

But the verbs to locate and to situate also have additional meanings that are quite different from each other.

Amy
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"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
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Bulit, Locate, Situate #5 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:08 am   Bulit, Locate, Situate
 

Often, both is situated and is located can be replaced with just is.

In some countries people are taught in school that some expression or other in their own language MUST be translated as is situated. As a result, people go crazy with the expression, use it too much, and seldom use just the word is, which is the more common way of expressing location.
Jamie (K)
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Joined: 24 Feb 2006
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