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being more than is needed; excessive; unnecessary
salient
striped
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superfluous
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Expression: "You don't say!"



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Functions of Infinitive | Differences between CFR, CPT, DAF and DDP and its menaing
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Expression: "You don't say!" #1 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 19:51 pm   Expression: "You don't say!"
 

Dear friends

When do we use the given expression?

* You don't say!

Thanks a lot

Tom
Tom
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You don't say! #2 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 20:39 pm   You don't say!
 

Quote:
You don't say!

You can use this expression when you are surprised at what someone has said. You could also say: "Really?"
Conchita
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You don't say! #3 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 21:46 pm   You don't say!
 

Hi Conchita,

Quote:
when you are surprised

surprised... but negative or positive?

Does 'You don't say so!' mean that a person, who exclaims, has some doubts about what he/she was talked (and voices the doubt)?
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Tamara
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You don't say (so)! #4 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 22:43 pm   You don't say (so)!
 

Tamara wrote:
Hi Conchita,

Quote:
when you are surprised

surprised... but negative or positive?

Does 'You don't say so!' mean that a person, who exclaims, has some doubts about what he/she was told (and voices the doubt)?

Yes, that's right, Tamara. You can also say that when you find something hard to believe. Sometimes it is used ironically, as well.
Conchita
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You don't say (so)! #5 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 23:00 pm   You don't say (so)!
 

Thank you, Conchita, for the answer (and for told)

So, as I understand, it would be generally inappropriate (not polite) for a pupil to exclaim it when talking with a teacher. For example.
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Tamara
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Location: UK

You don't say (so)! #6 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 10:36 am   You don't say (so)!
 

Tamara wrote:
Thank you, Conchita, for the answer (and for told)

So, as I understand, it would be generally inappropriate (not polite) for a pupil to exclaim it when talking with a teacher. For example.

It would probably depend on the relationship between teacher and student, on the tone with which it is spoken, on the teacher’s sense of humour, perhaps on their ages, etc. But, basically, I agree with you that it might not be a good idea to say that to a teacher — and definitely not if it is said with irony :) ! When students question something the teacher has said, they should express their doubts openly, I think.
Conchita
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Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
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