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Borrow vs. lend



 
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Borrow vs. lend #1 (permalink) Sun Jun 04, 2006 21:07 pm   Borrow vs. lend
 

Common Errors in English, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #12 "Latin Words", question 10

I can borrow you a little money if you like because as they say, every little helps.

(a) borrow
(b) little
(c) as
(d) every little

Common Errors in English, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #12 "Latin Words", answer 10

I can lend you a little money if you like because as they say, every little helps.

Correct entry: lend
The error was: (a) borrow

You have found the error and your entry is correct.
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For speakers of USA English the idiom is 'every little bit'. Consequently an American English speaker might assume that 'borrow' might be idiomatic in UK English. Also 'borrow' is correct if the intention of 'I' is to borrow money and give the proceeds to 'you.'

USA speaker of English
US English speaker John
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Borrow vs. lend #2 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 7:23 am   Borrow vs. lend
 

Hi USA speaker of English,

You said:

Quote:
For speakers of USA English the idiom is 'every little bit'. Consequently an American English speaker might assume that 'borrow' might be idiomatic in UK English. Also 'borrow' is correct if the intention of 'I' is to borrow money and give the proceeds to 'you.'

You make some unusual assumptions. If I understand it, you are saying that you would say: every little bit helps. Fine, I could say every little bit helps, too. The point is I said every little helps. I don't really see there is a divide here between this distinction between what you say and what I say. You then claim that:
Quote:
I can borrow you a little money if you like because as they say, every little helps.
means I can borrow for you .... I don't find this very plausible.

Alan
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Borrow vs. lend #3 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 1:07 am   Borrow vs. lend
 

good point english speaker
Nabilchamlal
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Borrow vs. lend #4 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 7:07 am   Borrow vs. lend
 

What's so good about it?

borrow - from someone else
lend - to someone else.

borrow from someone to lend to someone else is: The sentence would have to read "I can borrow money for you..." not "I can borrow you money."
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Borrow vs. lend #5 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 8:42 am   Borrow vs. lend
 

Hi Nabilchamlal,

I've heard of a delayed reaction but 4 years takes some beating. Tell me in what way you support comments made by USA speaker of English 4 years ago.

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Borrow vs. lend #6 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 12:17 pm   Borrow vs. lend
 

I think that -for- somehow delays time, suppose that someone is near and you are asking money for him, in this case you donít need to add for because its simultaneous action. Alan I think that is not me who gives the beat itís the time.
Nabilchamlal
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Borrow vs. lend #7 (permalink) Mon May 17, 2010 12:26 pm   Borrow vs. lend
 

Hi Nabilchamlal,

'I can borrow you money' even after 4 years still sounds wonky to me whatever the situation. 'I can lend you money' sounds all right because 'you' becomes the natural indirect object with 'to' understood. Since this doesn't apply to 'borrow', which is naturally associated with 'from', I feel you would say: I can borrow money for you.

Alan
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