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What is the difference between 'leave work' and 'leave from work'



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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What is the difference between 'leave work' and 'leave from work' #1 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 22:55 pm   What is the difference between 'leave work' and 'leave from work'
 

Hi,

I was in the neighbourhood so I dropped by for asking you something:
Whichone is right: " I leave work at six" or " I leave from work at six"

Thanks, and all the best
Spencer
Spencer
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Joined: 07 Feb 2006
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Leave from #2 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 23:01 pm   Leave from
 

Howdy, Spencer!

Glad you just happened to be in the neighborhood and decided to drop by. :D

You should say: "I leave work at six".

Amy
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Leave from #3 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 23:16 pm   Leave from
 

Amy,
Still awake?
So if I say: I leave FROM work , is not correct at all,
or the other just sounds better?
I mean I CAN'T say : leave from work, can I?
Spencer
Spencer
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 326

Leave from #4 (permalink) Mon Jun 05, 2006 23:39 pm   Leave from
 

Hi Spencer

You could use "leave from work" in this special way:

I'm planning to drive to Italy for a vacation. I'm going to pack the car on Friday morning and go to work as usual. At 6 o'clock on Friday evening, I'm going to leave from work and drive to my vacation destination.

In the example above, you can leave directly from work (rather than from home) because the car is already packed and you don't need to go home again before beginning your drive to Italy.

If you just want to talk about the normal time you finish work every day (and leave the building), then you should not use "from".

Good night
Amy :D
_________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." ~ Abraham Lincoln
Yankee
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 8325
Location: USA

Leave from #5 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 0:24 am   Leave from
 

Thanks Amy,
I got it, it was a bit strange because I heard someone using it with "from", but everything's clear now, thanks to you :)
Spencer
Spencer
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 326

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