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'in a rush and swamped'?



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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'in a rush and swamped'? #1 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 15:52 pm   'in a rush and swamped'?
 

So, what does 'swamped' mean in this context -- the closing line in an email:

"In a rush and am swamped." Does this mean the person has a lot of work to do?

Thanks in advance,
Torsten

TOEIC short conversations: Doctor's secretary calls client to remind her about appointment.
Torsten
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Torsten Daerr

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'in a rush and swamped'? #2 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 16:29 pm   'in a rush and swamped'?
 

Hi Torsten

Yes, exactly, that person not only doesn't have much time at the moment, but is also up to his eyeballs in work. :D

Amy
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'in a rush and swamped'? #3 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 18:33 pm   'in a rush and swamped'?
 

Dear Amy

How could we use the expression? See below, please.

1- I am in a rush and am swamped.
2- She was in a rush and was swamped, and thus could not see me.

Am I right in my use of the given expression?

Thanks

Tom
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'in a rush and swamped'? #4 (permalink) Tue Jun 06, 2006 21:09 pm   'in a rush and swamped'?
 

Hi Tom

Being in a rush really doesn't have any connection with swamped. You can be in a rush without being swamped. If you're in a rush, it simply means you're short of time.

Sorry, I'd like to chat longer, but I'm in a rush. I've got an dentist appointment in 10 minutes, so I have to leave now.

Swamped means that someone has an incredibly large amount of work to do. (Or has deal with an incredible amount of something.) So much that it might seem almost impossible to finish or deal with it all. The person might be overwhelmed by it.

He is swamped with work. He'll probably have to work overtime for the next 6 months to get it all finished.

He was swamped with requests for help.

Be up to your eyeballs in (something) is an idiom that means 'have a huge amount of ' (usually work). This expression has no literal connection at all with an ability to see.
I've also heard this idiom as be up to your ears in (something). It has exactly the same meaning.

Amy
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