Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
educator; teacher; trainer
instructor
swap
care
profession
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Difference between mess and messy



 
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Difference between "name" and "call" her | Meaning of "Put across"
listening exercises
Message
Author
Difference between mess and messy #1 (permalink) Sat Jun 10, 2006 14:39 pm   Difference between mess and messy
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #45 "Basic English Expressions", question 1

My desk is a ........., I should clean it.

(a) messy
(b) slob
(c) mess
(d) sloppy

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #45 "Basic English Expressions", answer 1

My desk is a mess, I should clean it.

Correct answer: (c) mess

Your answer was: incorrect
My desk is a messy, I should clean it.
_________________________

what is the different between mess and messy

Lola
Lola
Guest





Mess/messy #2 (permalink) Sat Jun 10, 2006 15:43 pm   Mess/messy
 

Quote:
What is the difference between mess and messy?

The same difference as between different and difference: the former is an adjective and the latter is a noun.

Since the test sentence included the indefinite article 'a', you need a noun: mess. Using the adjective, the sentence would have to read: My desk is messy.
Conchita
Language Coach


Joined: 26 Dec 2005
Posts: 2826
Location: Madrid, Spain

Learn some cool expressions in the following cool storyEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Start exploring the English language today! Subscribe to free email English course
Difference between mess and messy #3 (permalink) Fri Jan 23, 2009 14:28 pm   Difference between mess and messy
 

But the question is need a noun not a adjective ~_~
Please check it again :D
" My desk is a mess "
Juna2020
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 12

Difference between mess and messy #4 (permalink) Thu Apr 08, 2010 19:10 pm   Difference between mess and messy
 

Hi moderators,
I am really confused about this sentence ,why we do not use an adjective here (sloppy) becouse i should clean it when it is sloppy.
and what is the meaning of mess if we use it in this sentence as a noun ,is it possible to use a noun after verb to be ,why not messy.
I am an engineer(adj) not I am an engine(noun).
Thank you in advance.
Mouhannad
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 07 Jan 2010
Posts: 41
Location: Syria

Difference between mess and messy #5 (permalink) Thu Apr 08, 2010 23:15 pm   Difference between mess and messy
 

As Conchita has already said, you could use 'messy' if you removed the indefinite article 'a'. The 'a' needs to be followed by a noun.
If it weren't a test, and you were just indicating the state of your desk, then you could say, 'My desk is messy.' and be perfectly correct. But when you are given the sentence structure you have to use the form which fits that structure. In this case, "My desk is a mess.'
_________________
"Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened."
Terry Pratchett
Beeesneees
Language Coach


Joined: 08 Apr 2010
Posts: 39144
Location: UK, born and bred

Difference between mess and messy #6 (permalink) Mon Apr 19, 2010 5:37 am   Difference between mess and messy
 

what is the differrint?
Hanan Hassan
New Member


Joined: 19 Apr 2010
Posts: 6

Difference between mess and messy #7 (permalink) Mon Apr 19, 2010 13:26 pm   Difference between mess and messy
 

a mess - noun
messy - adjective.
_________________
"Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened."
Terry Pratchett
Beeesneees
Language Coach


Joined: 08 Apr 2010
Posts: 39144
Location: UK, born and bred

Re: Mess/messy #8 (permalink) Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:50 am   Re: Mess/messy
 

Why mess is the right option?

I think option C messy is right!

Can you please explain me this.............................

i am waiting

Best regards
Partap Singh
Partap548
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Apr 2011
Posts: 20
Location: India

Difference between mess and messy #9 (permalink) Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:00 am   Difference between mess and messy
 

Hi,

'Messy' is the adjective. You need a noun (mess) after the indefinite article 'a'.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

Difference between mess and messy #10 (permalink) Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:30 am   Difference between mess and messy
 

Mouhannad wrote:
I am an engineer (adj noun) not I am an engine(noun).
Thank you in advance.

TOEIC short conversations: Aranging a meeting
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17788
Location: EU

Re: Mess/messy #11 (permalink) Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:31 am   Re: Mess/messy
 

Partap548 wrote:
Why mess is the right option?

I think option C messy is right!

Can you please explain me this.............................

I am waiting.

Best regards
Partap Singh

TOEIC short conversations: Delivering an agreement
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17788
Location: EU

Re: Difference between mess and messy #12 (permalink) Fri Jul 27, 2012 12:52 pm   Re: Difference between mess and messy
 

thanks mam!

Best Regards
Partap Singh
Partap548
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Apr 2011
Posts: 20
Location: India

Display posts from previous:   
Difference between "name" and "call" her | Meaning of "Put across"
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
Test incompl/inter-222, Question 4Test incompl/inter-222, User's Answer 3Test incompl/elem-191, User's Answer 10What does pass away mean?Takes afterIs I ate already correct?Total confusion!Debt vs. debitdifference between happen to and come to?Prepositions: "far from", "next to"What does "to mark down" mean?Difference between supressed and muffledWhat does this phrase mean: "I don't care"? Is it an idiom?

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail