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dare + verb vs. dare to + verb



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
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dare + verb vs. dare to + verb #1 (permalink) Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:55 am   dare + verb vs. dare to + verb
 

Hi,

I learned that dare is followed by an infinitive but recently I've seen sentences where with a "dare to" construction.

How do you use the verb 'dare'? Do you say I dare use this verb or I dare to use this verb?

Thanks,
Torsten

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Torsten
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dare + verb vs. dare to + verb #2 (permalink) Tue Nov 06, 2007 7:25 am   dare + verb vs. dare to + verb
 

.
Both are in common use, I think, Torsten-- I at least use it both ways...I think. Swan says that 'dare to' is the commoner, and that 'dare' occurs more often in some set situations (like 'I daresay').
.
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2 main verbs, infinitve #3 (permalink) Tue May 04, 2010 18:40 pm   2 main verbs, infinitve
 

Hi everybody,

New Living Translation Version
Quote:
1) And then no one dared to ask him any more questions.

Good News Version
Quote:
2) For they did not dare ask him any more questions.

King James Version
Quote:
3) And after that they dared not ask him any question at all.

durst=dared

-In sentence 2, Why two consecutive main verbs?
-In sentence 3, why ‘to ask’ is not used, whereas in sentence 1, ‘to ask’ is used?

Thanks in advance
David30
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dare + verb vs. dare to + verb #4 (permalink) Tue May 04, 2010 19:34 pm   dare + verb vs. dare to + verb
 

Hi,
"Dare" can be used in two ways:
1.As an ordinary(main) verb, followed by the infinitive, is most common:
She didn't dare to tell him what had happened.
2.As a modal auxiliary, followed by the infinitive without to, is least used:
I daren't look.
However, mixed ordinary+modal structures are occasionally found:
He didn't dare open his eyes.
Hope this helps,
Morteza
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dare + verb vs. dare to + verb #5 (permalink) Wed May 05, 2010 12:18 pm   dare + verb vs. dare to + verb
 

Do the following sentences mean the same?

- And after that they dared not ask him any question at all.
- And after that they dared not to ask him any question at all.

Thanks in advance
David30
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 05 Oct 2009
Posts: 180

dare + verb vs. dare to + verb #6 (permalink) Wed May 05, 2010 12:49 pm   dare + verb vs. dare to + verb
 

The second is not used in English. Your choices are:

- And after that they dared not ask him any question at all.
- And after that they didn't dare to ask him any question at all.

The meanings are the same.
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